The Bloomsbury Look

What is the ‘Bloomsbury Look’? Charleston’s former curator Wendy Hitchmough reveals how the Bloomsbury group generated its avant-garde, self-fashioned aesthetic through art, photography and dress in her captivating new book.  (more…)

Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Siddal and the Famous Women Dinner Service

Today Elizabeth Eleanor Siddal (25 July 1829 – 11 February 1862), or Lizzie as she was styled and commonly known, would be celebrating her 191st birthday.

Siddal was an English artist, poet, and artists’ model whose beauty, talents and life were recognised by Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant in their playful, yet groundbreaking project: the Famous Women Dinner Service.

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Duncan Grant’s nude portraits

It’s National Nude Day! A great opportunity to draw your attention to one of my all-time favourite paintings in Charleston’s collection — Standing Male Nude (c.1935) by Duncan Grant — and have a brief look at the trajectory that nude painting took in Grant’s oeuvre.

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Omega Workshops, 1913-1919

Opening room of the Omega Workshops, 33 Fitzroy Square, London. © The Charleston Trust

On 8 July 1913 the Omega Workshops opened their doors at 33 Fitzroy Square in the heart of bohemian London.

Founded by painter and art critic Roger Fry (1866-1934), the Workshops employed some of the most radical avant-garde artists of the day, with Vanessa Bell (1879-1961) and Duncan Grant (1885-1978) as co-directors. Their anti-establishment approach paired with Post-Impressionist experimentalism produced modern designs and items for the home, from printed fabrics and textiles to ceramics, furniture and clothing.

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A Garden of One’s Own

By Charleston’s Gardener, Harry Hoblyn

The walled garden in flower this summer. Photo © Harry Hoblyn.

The first weeks of June have finally brought us some rain; the sky undulating between an ominous spectral grey, and that bright-eyed, azure clarity so generous throughout the previous months. All this time I have been gardening in privileged, paradisiacal isolation, left for the most part to my own devices, nurturing a sanctuary that has seen few visitors.

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CHARLESTON’S 2019 AUTUMN/WINTER EXHIBITION ANNOUNCED

POST-IMPRESSIONIST LIVING: THE OMEGA WORKSHOPS

14 September 2019 – 19 January 2020

100 years after the Omega Workshops closed their doors in the heart of bohemian London, a major exhibition exploring their radical approach to modern design and living is set to open at Charleston where the Workshops’ ideals found their most convincing expression.

Established by the painter and art critic Roger Fry in 1913, the Omega Workshops were a design enterprise that employed many of the most avant-garde artists of the day. Inspired by the new, vital spirit of Post-Impressionism they created thrillingly bold, colourful and abstract items for the home that challenged the social sensibilities of Edwardian Britain. In 1913, Fry remarked to a journalist:

“it is time that the spirit of fun was introduced into furniture and into fabrics. We have suffered too long from the dull and the stupidly serious”.

Opening room of the Omega Workshops, 33 Fitzroy Square, London. © The Charleston Trust

Collage, Duncan Grant, design for a fire screen panel, 1916, mixed media and gouache on board, framed, glazed, signed and dated. © The Estate of Duncan Grant. All rights reserved. DACS 2019 and The Charleston Trust.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post-Impressionist Living: The Omega Workshops will feature the largest display of Omega objects in more than 30 years, with around 200 works on show. The exhibition traces the Workshops’ philosophy and beginnings through to their pioneering experiments in interior design.

Drawing on loans from the V&A, The Courtauld Gallery, a number of private collectors and Charleston’s own collection, the exhibition will showcase some of the finest examples of the Workshops’ furniture, ceramics, printed fabrics and textiles, including many works on public display for the first time. Works on paper that reveal the vision and design processes of the artists who worked at the Omega Workshops will also feature.

Fry viewed art as a necessary facet of everyday life and, through the Omega Workshops, sought to remove what he saw as the false division between fine and decorative art. This experimental moment in design history sparked a change in British taste and style that still resonates today. At its height, artists working at the Workshops included Paul Nash, Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, Frederick and Jessie Etchells, Nina Hamnett, Henri Doucet, Edward Wadsworth and Wyndham Lewis.

Well ahead of their time, the Workshops’ expressive, colourful and bold designs pioneered many of the trends which became wildly fashionable in the fabrics and ceramics of the 1920s and 30s. Virginia Woolf, George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells, W.B. Yeats and E.M. Forster; as well as high society figures like Lady Ottoline Morrell and Maud Cunard were among the customers at the Workshops’ premises at 33 Fitzroy Square, London. Even Gertrude Stein paid a visit.

As the former home of the Omega Workshops’ co-directors, Bloomsbury artists Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant, Charleston is a fitting setting for the exhibition. The House’s playfully painted interiors, brightly decorated furniture and embroideries make it the living embodiment of a Post-Impressionist inspired home. When Bell and Grant moved to Charleston in October 1916 they brought an array of Omega items with them, and today Charleston’s collection includes the tableware the Bloomsbury group ate with and the chairs they sat on.

Dr Darren Clarke, Head of Collections, Research and Exhibitions at Charleston who has curated the exhibition said:

“Roger Fry’s vision for the Omega Workshops was to bring the Post-Impressionist aesthetic into the home. Charleston is that living ideal; a place where art and design merge and live harmoniously. Still inspiring artists and creatives today, the Omega created exciting and radical designs, looking for honesty and integrity as well as beauty and mindfulness in the items people chose for their homes”.

Spanning the Wolfson, Spotlight and South Galleries, Post-Impressionist Living: The Omega Workshops is the latest exhibition to be staged in Charleston’s new galleries which opened last September. From Cubist-style lampshade holders and rugs to Fauvist-inspired textiles, the exhibition will give visitors a taste of what it must have been like to step inside the Omega Workshops’ studios and showrooms, with a diverse range of items being made and sold.

The Omega Workshops managed to stay open throughout the First World War, eventually closing in 1919. Although short-lived, this visionary group of design disruptors had a far-reaching influence and paved the way for more expressive forms of representation in decorative art that retained the artist’s touch.

Post-Impressionist Living: The Omega Workshops

14 September 2019 – 19 January 2020

Wednesday – Sunday/Bank Holidays: 10am – 5pm.

#omegaworkshops

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