Painting in the Garden | Autumn

The Garden at Charleston, designed by artist and critic Roger Fry, was planted to be painted. Join artist Julian Le Bas for a day’s intensive painting tuition, and lose yourself in the atmosphere of the Walled Garden and surrounding grounds.

Suitable for improvers, this workshop will look at approaches to composition, with a particular emphasis on colour. Students may work in oil or acrylic. Easels and boards provided. Students will need to provide their own paints and brushes.

The cost of the day includes a tour of the House and Garden, a delicious lunch, tea and coffees.

 

The Garden in September:

September sees an entirely new group of plants – the garden moves into a purple/orange blend. The asters, both the perennial kind and the old fashioned annual varieties, Zinnias with their dense rosettes of the strongest possible orange and purple, tall cushions of pink and white phlox and a good show of Dahlias of all varieties from cactus-head to pom-pom. The fruit is ripe on the apple trees and the vegetable garden is overtaken with nasturtium flowers.

 

About the artist:

Born in 1958 – Sussex based painter Julian Le Bas studied at Hertfordshire College of Art and Design. Graduating at Brighton Polytechnic in 1981, with an affinity with the landscape developed; This was further explored in Cyprus at the College of Art on a Post Graduate Course in 1984.

Le Bas was selected for a Solo show at The Towner in 1990 and has exhibited widely including, The Bede Gallery, Jarrow, The Collective Gallery, Edinburgh, and The Jerwood Drawing Prize. He has just finished exhibiting his exhibition ‘Carpe Diem’ at St. Anne’s Galleries in Lewes.

Norbert Lynton wrote in the catalogue, ‘Artists in Sussex in the Twentieth Century’,’ For Julian Le Bas landscape is a live encounter and art, re-enacting of specific experiences, in paint or with charcoal on paper.’

CROWLINK | Shirley Collins

Photo c. Enda Bowe

 

Sunday 1 August 2021

“Never are voices so beautiful as when dusk almost hides the body” Virginia Woolf

Legendary folk singer Shirley Collins makes a pilgrimage to the heart of the Sussex landscape that fuels her work, in a unique collaboration with artist and writer Brian Catling and acclaimed sound artist Matthew Shaw.

CROWLINK is an immersive sound installation in the Walled Garden at Charleston, with traditional song and original poetry interwoven with field recordings. The evening culminates in the Hay Barn with performance from Catling and an intimate concert from Shirley Collins and the Lodestar Band.

Gallery, gardens & soundscape open from 6pm for 7.30pm start

In partnership with Melting Vinyl.

Please refer to the Facebook event for up to date information.

 

This event replaces the previous dates, which had been postponed due to Coronavirus/Covid 19. Any tickets bought for 3 May/19 July remain valid for the 1 August 2021, all other event details remain the same. 

 

We are hoping to run a shuttle bus service for this event.This will be confirmed nearer the time, please check Facebook pages for updates.

Note: Trains to Brighton leave regularly until 23.43 (Sat) 23.23 (Sun)

Leaving from the lower Charleston Car Park (allow 5-10 minutes to walk there from the Hay Barn)
 
 
 
 

Latest news:

On the 24th July 2020, Shirley Collins will release Heart’s Ease, her second album for Domino.  Heart’s Ease follows 2016’s Lodestar; which on its arrival, seemed like a musical miracle – an enthralling new LP from a woman who is widely acknowledged as England’s greatest female folk singer, but who had not recorded an album for 38 years.

The first song to be shared from Heart’s Ease is “Wondrous Love”; its tune comes from an 18th Century English ballad about the infamous sea captain William Kidd, who was hanged for piracy in 1701.

Watch the video for “Wondrous Love” here

Stream “Wondrous Love” here

‘An album of true stature and one that’s destined to remain in your affections.’ David Kidman, Folk Radio

 

 

About the artists:

 

Shirley Collins

‘Shirley Collins is without doubt one of England’s greatest cultural treasures’ Billy Bragg

‘Shirley is a time traveller, a conduit for essential human aches, one of the greatest artists who ever lived, and yet utterly humble’ Stewart Lee

‘Fifty years since she last performed live at The Roundhouse alongside her late sister Dolly, Folk’s grande dame Shirley Collins makes a triumphant return, evidentially having lost nothing in the art of stark storytelling over the preceding years.’ Folk Radio January 2019

A performance of unwavering and revelatory intimacy: Guardian *****

Brian Catling

“Brian Catling is simply a genius. His writing is so extraordinary it hurts, it makes me realize how little imagination I have.” —Terry Gilliam

“I am glad to have the book as a companion on my own dark quest.” —Tom Waits

“There are not many books that rearrange the molecules of your being, turning your eyes inside out. The Vorrh, this saturnine post-traumatic testament, is one of them. A work of genius.” —Iain Sinclair

Matthew Shaw

‘A beautifully understated, fragile affair. Bewitching and addictive.’ The Times

‘Shaw conjures the ghostly afterimage of ritual songforms and reassembles them as lucid, revenant forms animating particular landscapes’ David Keenan

‘His multi-levelled music is immersive and captures the ‘genius loci’ or spirit of place with awe-inspiring sensitivity.’ Gary Cook, The Ecologist

CROWLINK | Shirley Collins

photo c. Enda Bowe

Saturday 31 July 2021

“Never are voices so beautiful as when dusk almost hides the body” Virginia Woolf

Legendary folk singer Shirley Collins makes a pilgrimage to the heart of the Sussex landscape that fuels her work, in a unique collaboration with artist and writer Brian Catling and acclaimed sound artist Matthew Shaw.

CROWLINK is an immersive sound installation in the Walled Garden at Charleston, with traditional song and original poetry interwoven with field recordings. The evening culminates in the Hay Barn with performance from Catling and an intimate concert from Shirley Collins and the Lodestar Band.

Gallery, gardens & soundscape open from 6pm for 7.30pm start

In partnership with Melting Vinyl.

Please refer to the Facebook event for up to date information.

 

This event replaces the previous dates, which had been postponed due to Coronavirus/Covid 19. Any tickets bought for 2 May/18 July remain valid for the 31 July 2021, all other event details remain the same. 

 

We are hoping to run a shuttle bus service for this event.This will be confirmed nearer the time, please check Facebook pages for updates.

Note: Trains to Brighton leave regularly until 23.43 (Sat) 23.23 (Sun)

Leaving from the lower Charleston Car Park (allow 5-10 minutes to walk there from the Hay Barn)
 
 
 
 

Latest news:

On the 24th July 2020, Shirley Collins will release Heart’s Ease, her second album for Domino.  Heart’s Ease follows 2016’s Lodestar; which on its arrival, seemed like a musical miracle – an enthralling new LP from a woman who is widely acknowledged as England’s greatest female folk singer, but who had not recorded an album for 38 years.

The first song to be shared from Heart’s Ease is “Wondrous Love”; its tune comes from an 18th Century English ballad about the infamous sea captain William Kidd, who was hanged for piracy in 1701.

Watch the video for “Wondrous Love” here

Stream “Wondrous Love” here

‘An album of true stature and one that’s destined to remain in your affections.’ David Kidman, Folk Radio

 

 

About the artists:

 

Shirley Collins

‘Shirley Collins is without doubt one of England’s greatest cultural treasures’ Billy Bragg

‘Shirley is a time traveller, a conduit for essential human aches, one of the greatest artists who ever lived, and yet utterly humble’ Stewart Lee

‘Fifty years since she last performed live at The Roundhouse alongside her late sister Dolly, Folk’s grande dame Shirley Collins makes a triumphant return, evidentially having lost nothing in the art of stark storytelling over the preceding years.’ Folk Radio January 2019

A performance of unwavering and revelatory intimacy: Guardian *****

Brian Catling

“Brian Catling is simply a genius. His writing is so extraordinary it hurts, it makes me realize how little imagination I have.” —Terry Gilliam

“I am glad to have the book as a companion on my own dark quest.” —Tom Waits

“There are not many books that rearrange the molecules of your being, turning your eyes inside out. The Vorrh, this saturnine post-traumatic testament, is one of them. A work of genius.” —Iain Sinclair

Matthew Shaw

‘A beautifully understated, fragile affair. Bewitching and addictive.’ The Times

‘Shaw conjures the ghostly afterimage of ritual songforms and reassembles them as lucid, revenant forms animating particular landscapes’ David Keenan

‘His multi-levelled music is immersive and captures the ‘genius loci’ or spirit of place with awe-inspiring sensitivity.’ Gary Cook, The Ecologist

Painting in the Garden | Summer

The Garden at Charleston, designed by artist and critic Roger Fry, was planted to be painted. Join artist Julian Le Bas for a day’s intensive painting tuition, and lose yourself in the atmosphere of the Walled Garden and surrounding grounds.

Suitable for improvers, this workshop will look at approaches to composition, with a particular emphasis on colour. Students may work in oil or acrylic. Easels and boards provided. Students will need to provide their own paints and brushes.

The cost of the day includes a tour of the House and Garden, a delicious lunch, tea and coffees.

 

The Garden in July

July sees roses galore including the pale butterfly-like petals of ‘Francis E. Leicester’ clambering through the apple tree, and ‘Eglantine’ enveloping the busts on top of the walls with their bright pink buds. ‘ Félicité Perpétue‘ cascades creamy white clusters of roses from the patio walls and the richly perfumed petals of the ‘Roseraie de l’Haÿ’ crowd the shadier borders.  The herbaceous borders zing with Red hot pokers, overarched by the spires of hollyhocks and bold, purple artichokes. Iris, poppy and Canterbury bells jostle for position and the Lilly buds start to swell.

 

About the artist:

Born in 1958 – Sussex based painter Julian Le Bas studied at Hertfordshire College of Art and Design. Graduating at Brighton Polytechnic in 1981, with an affinity with the landscape developed; This was further explored in Cyprus at the College of Art on a Post Graduate Course in 1984.

Le Bas was selected for a Solo show at The Towner in 1990 and has exhibited widely including, The Bede Gallery, Jarrow, The Collective Gallery, Edinburgh, and The Jerwood Drawing Prize. He has just finished exhibiting his exhibition ‘Carpe Diem’ at St. Anne’s Galleries in Lewes.

Norbert Lynton wrote in the catalogue, ‘Artists in Sussex in the Twentieth Century’,’ For Julian Le Bas landscape is a live encounter and art, re-enacting of specific experiences, in paint or with charcoal on paper.’

ON DEMAND Bloomsbury at home: bodies

The Bloomsbury group has long divided opinion. To some they are a privileged elite, unoriginal and self-absorbed. To others they are at the vanguard of modernism, decades ahead of the social, moral and artistic codes of the day. Leonard Woolf wrote that the Bloomsbury group were “A largely imaginary group of persons… with largely imaginary characteristics”. This series of talks strips back the layers of mythology surrounding the Bloomsbury group and goes back to source – to their books, essays, articles, letters and diaries. This is the Bloomsbury group in their own words.

How it works

You will be sent a link in your ticket. Simply log in, settle down with your tea or coffee, and immerse yourself in literature, thoughts and ideas with our reader-in-residence Holly Dawson.

Sessions will also be available on-demand until 14 March.

Week 5

Bodies

‘I could feel ecstasies and raptures spontaneously and intensely and without any shame or the least sense of guilt, so long as they were disconnected with my own body.’ (Virginia Woolf)

 

What role did the body play in the thinking, painting and writing of the Bloomsbury Group? In this session, we explore the corporeal realm of the Bloomsbury Group – from body image and nudity to food, illness and death. We’ll consider the Cartesian split between body and mind, placing the spotlight in particular on the embodied writing of ballerina Lydia Lopokova, Roger Fry’s kinetic descriptions of working with clay, Vanessa’s nude portraits at Studlands, and the contrasting crossover with NeoPaganism and Vorticism. We will trace ideas back to the Victorian connotations of the body they inherited, in particular Julia Stephen’s work as a nurse and a model. To what extent is the female body in particular a site for politics, creativity and identity?

 

Angelica Garnett (far left) with Duncan Grant, Virginia Woolf and Lydia Lopokova having a tea party in the Charleston garden in the 1930s. Photo © The Charleston Trust.

ON DEMAND Bloomsbury at home: love & sex

The Bloomsbury group has long divided opinion. To some they are a privileged elite, unoriginal and self-absorbed. To others they are at the vanguard of modernism, decades ahead of the social, moral and artistic codes of the day. Leonard Woolf wrote that the Bloomsbury group were “A largely imaginary group of persons… with largely imaginary characteristics”. This series of talks strips back the layers of mythology surrounding the Bloomsbury group and goes back to source – to their books, essays, articles, letters and diaries. This is the Bloomsbury group in their own words.

How it works

You will be sent a ticket with your link and login details. Simply log in, and immerse yourself in literature, thoughts and ideas with our reader-in-residence Holly Dawson.

Sessions will also be available on-demand until 14th March. 

 

Week 3

Love & sex

“Suddenly the door opened and the long and sinister figure of Mr Lytton Strachey stood on the threshold. He pointed his finger at a stain on Vanessa’s white dress.

‘Semen?’ he said.
Can one really say it? I thought and we burst out laughing. With that one word all barriers of reticence and reserve went down. Sex permeated our conversation. The word bugger was never far from our lips.” (Virginia Woolf)

 

The Bloomsbury group famously ‘lived in squares, painted in circles and loved in triangles’ – but the myths, gossip and headlines of their personal lives can distract us from the far richer and more nuanced ideas around love, sex and relationships that informed how they worked and lived. This session explores how the transgression of traditional relationship models went hand in hand with their pursuit of a new and radical aesthetic. Decades ahead of the social and moral codes of the day, the fluid nature of their relationships has resonance even today. We look at the overlapping and complicated relationships within Bloomsbury and explore what part romantic and carnal love played within them.

 

Angelica Garnett (far left) with Duncan Grant, Virginia Woolf and Lydia Lopokova having a tea party in the Charleston garden in the 1930s. Photo © The Charleston Trust.

ON DEMAND Bloomsbury at Home: home

The Bloomsbury group has long divided opinion. To some they are a privileged elite, unoriginal and self-absorbed. To others they are at the vanguard of modernism, decades ahead of the social, moral and artistic codes of the day. Leonard Woolf wrote that the Bloomsbury group were “A largely imaginary group of persons… with largely imaginary characteristics”. This series of talks strips back the layers of mythology surrounding the Bloomsbury group and goes back to source – to their books, essays, articles, letters and diaries. This is the Bloomsbury group in their own words.

How it works

You will be sent a link and login details on your ticket.  Simply log in, settle down with your tea or coffee, and immerse yourself in literature, thoughts and ideas with our reader-in-residence Holly Dawson.

Sessions will also be available until 14th March so you can watch whenever is most convenient for you. 

Week 2

Home

”What cuts the deepest channels in our lives are the different houses in which we live.” Leonard Woolf

The Bloomsbury group challenged conventional notions of what a home should be, who lived in it and how. Rejecting the high Victorian domesticity that shaped them so profoundly, they reimagined home as a space where the boundaries between art and life dissolved and traditional roles became fluid.  Join us as we peer through the keyholes of various Bloomsbury Group homes – from the Stephens’ family home at Hyde Park Gate, to various homes in London squares and Lady Ottoline Morrell’s Garsington retreat. We will explore Charleston through the eyes of Angelica Garnett, returning home in later life in her powerful memoir, and watch some rare footage of life at Tidmarsh, Carrington and Lytton’s home.  What kind of places did the Bloomsbury group call home? What did ‘home’ mean and how did their ambitions for a new way of living influence that? What did everyday domestic life look like?

 

Angelica Garnett (far left) with Duncan Grant, Virginia Woolf and Lydia Lopokova having a tea party in the Charleston garden in the 1930s. Photo © The Charleston Trust.

Duncan Grant’s nude portraits

It’s National Nude Day! A great opportunity to draw your attention to one of my all-time favourite paintings in Charleston’s collection — Standing Male Nude (c.1935) by Duncan Grant — and have a brief look at the trajectory that nude painting took in Grant’s oeuvre.

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CHARLESTON RANKED ONE OF THE UK’S TOP EXPERIENCES BY LONELY PLANET

At Charleston we’re thrilled to be named among the UK’s top places to visit by Lonely Planet in their #UltimateUKTravelist of the most memorable, beautiful, surprising and compelling experiences to be had across Great Britain, Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands. 

Duncan Grant’s studio at Charleston © Electric Egg

The only complete preserved Bloomsbury interior in the world, Charleston’s individually designed and hand-painted rooms were inspired by Italian fresco painting and the Post-Impressionists. Visitors can take a tour around the unique spaces and explore the stories and lives of the artists, writers and thinkers who made it their home. Alongside the house, Charleston runs a programme of exhibitions, workshops, talks and events throughout the year, as well as a portfolio of literary festivals.

Charleston is one of just 34 attractions from the South East of England to make the Lonely Planet’s ‘Ultimate United Kingdom Travelist’.

The UK’s four constituent countries and countless small islands comprise a powerhouse of history, culture and intrigue. Now for the first time, Lonely Planet’s community of travel experts have chosen the best sights and experiences and ranked them in order of their brilliance in Lonely Planet’s ‘Ultimate United Kingdom Travelist’.

Lonely Planet’s VP of Experience, Tom Hall, said:

“Lonely Planet’s ‘Ultimate United Kingdom Travelist’ brings together the UK’s most compelling sights and experiences, ranging from world-class museums and giant cathedrals to rollicking festivals, inky lochs and tiny pubs.”

To create Lonely Planet’s ‘Ultimate United Kingdom Travelist’, the Lonely Planet team compiled every highlight from the Lonely Planet guidebooks for Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Every sight, attraction and experience that had caught their writers’ attention over the years were included. Everyone in Lonely Planet’s London office, plus 20 leading figures in the country’s travel sector, were then asked to reveal their favourite spots and experiences before the voting began. Everybody in Lonely Planet’s UK community was asked to vote for their top 20 experiences. With hundreds of votes cast, Lonely Planet ended up with a score for each of the 500 experiences in the book.